water damage, pipes burts, duct cleaning, preventative measures for water damage

Six Easy Ways to Avoid Your Pipes Blowing Up This Winter

Whether you’re a first-time homebuyer or have finally paid off your mortgage, if you live in an area where the temperature drops below freezing, this is the time of year to consider frozen pipes or risk being caught with a nightmarish flooding situation. So, unless the thought of an unexpected flood cleaning and water damage restoration expense appeals to you, stay reading for six easy strategies to avoid your pipes from bursting this winter!

  1. Turn up the heat. We understand that you’re only trying to save energy for the sake of the environment and your power bills, but if you’re in a deep freeze, you’re raising the danger of a flooding disaster from pipes that freeze, expand, and then explode. So the simplest method to avoid a problem is to go to your thermostat and raise the temperature a few degrees. Closing the garage door is another simple technique to enhance the heat in your house.
  2. Turn on your inside faucets and let them drip. This keeps water moving, even if it’s only a trickle, which might help you avoid the threat of a frozen pipe that explodes later. It’s not necessary to have the faucet flowing in a stream; simply pick a setting that lets out a few droplets per minute will suffice. Over time, this may raise your water bill, but it’s definitely worth a few additional gallons of water each day as a short-term buffer against a deep freeze pipe problem.
  3. Take your garden hoses outdoors and disconnect them from the spigots. Even if you think your frost-proof spigot is protecting you, you still need to disconnect the hose from the nozzle to be entirely protected from a bursting pipe.
  4. Use fans and open cabinets. Once you’ve raised the heat in your house, make sure it’s flowing to all of the spots where pipes are exposed, such as under your kitchen and bathroom sinks, or even in your pantry. So, to help get warmer air from registers to the colder rooms in your house and the pipes themselves, open the doors to the concealed pipes and use fans to help get warmer air from registers to the colder rooms in your house and the pipes themselves.
  5. Warm your pipes using hot towels or hair dryers. Don’t use a blowtorch since you can end up harming the pipe and aggravating the problem you’re trying to avoid, but a softer method of warming can help protect the ice in your pipes from over-expanding and blasting into your house. Your coldest pipes are most likely in the basement, but if your basement isn’t finished, you should have easy access to the pipes that are most likely to break. When manually heating the pipes below, keep the water running from the faucets upstairs. When the flow from the faucets starts to increase, you’ll know you’ve achieved your goal.
  6. Warm your pipes using hot towels or hair dryers. Don’t use a blowtorch since you can end up harming the pipe and aggravating the problem you’re trying to avoid, but a softer method of warming can help protect the ice in your pipes from over-expanding and blasting into your house. Your coldest pipes are most likely in the basement, but if your basement isn’t finished, you should have easy access to the pipes that are most likely to break. When manually heating the pipes below, keep the water running from the faucets upstairs. When the flow from the faucets starts to increase, you’ll know you’ve achieved your goal.
    Have your pipes already burst? If you’re experiencing any form of flooding in your house, don’t hesitate to call your local service provider right once.